Report: 3D Printing – Technology and Beyond

Personal 3D printing is a technology that challenges many areas in business and government. The technology itself is not new, but it is rapidly developing in terms of quality and range of applications.

The main shift comes from the popularisation of the technology: as prices drop to consumer levels, 3D printing gains the potential to spark a new industrial revolution. Personal 3D printing technology, and its consequences for society, economics and government, is the topic of Netopia’s first English-language report: 3D Printing: Technology and Beyond.

Mathilde Berchon is the author of L’Impression 3D (Editions Eyrolles, 2013) and the main contributor to the Netopia’s new report. Mathilde Berchon’s chapters outline the innovations and history of the technology, explains the different techniques involved and takes a closer look at how governments around the world invest in promoting these developments. The chapter on legal consequences, primarily in consumer protection and intellectual property rights, is written by IP law specialist Christina Wainikka (LL.D.). Netopia-columnist Waldemar Ingdahl looks into the philosophical ideas that underpin the technology, its implementation and adoption.

Download the full report in English here.

The launch event on replay here.

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  1. […] ‘Maker Culture’ also reflects a wider trend: our growing expectation for technology to serve our very particular wants and needs. Our mentality is “There’s an app for everything”. Maker Culture runs parallel with growing technological solutionism – the notion that technology is the answer to most things. For more on Maker Culture see Chris Anderson’s book by the same name, or read the report on 3D Printing from the from Think-Tank Netopia.eu. […]

  2. […] ‘Maker Culture’ also reflects a wider trend: our growing expectation for technology to serve our very particular wants and needs. Our mentality is “There’s an app for everything”. Maker Culture runs parallel with growing technological solutionism – the notion that technology is the answer to most things. For more on Maker Culture see Chris Anderson’s book by the same name, or read the report on 3D Printing from the from Think-Tank Netopia.eu. […]

  3. […] bara några exempel på vad artikeln i DN hade kunnat ta upp. För den som vill veta mer har både Netopia och Entreprenörskapsforum publicerat rapporter, som även tar upp rättsliga […]

  4. Have just finished Chris Anderson’s third book, entitled “Makers”, which is all about the notion of fabrication at a local level for niche markets…kind of the long tail of production. I didn’t agree with much he had to say, and didn’t enjoy the book (if i am brutally honest) so thankfully this report can give a more academic perspective to the topic. Thanks!

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